professional body piercers

"A Must-Read"

I just found another wonderful review of The Piercing Bible on this blog:
Thank the powers that be for Elayne Angel! Her book, The Piercing Bible, is a must-read for anyone considering this art form as a career, anyone thinking of getting pierced, anyone who is already pierced and everyone in-between. Elayne leaves no stone unturned in this thoroughly researched guide to safe body piercing. She delves into the history of piercing and the effect this has had, and will likely have, on many generations, before exploring it in its current form as well as its future possibilities. From deciding what to pierce, to finding an accomplished and conscientious piercer; from hygiene issues to piercing trouble-shooting, Elayne has touched on it all. Being relatively new to the art, I found myself starved for solid, trustworthy information and, with decades of experience under her belt, Elayne shares a wealth of knowledge, dispels many misconceptions and offers sound advice from the effects your new piercing could have on society’s perceptions of you to lifestyle changes that might be necessary if you want to live in harmony with your piercing. The book also discusses different jewellery styles and sizes, equipment used during the different procedures, stretching of piercings, retiring of piercings, problems that may arise, and special situations such as breastfeeding and sex that may be compromised, or enhanced, by the piercing. The industry has waited a long time for this book and, after reading it, you might be able to tell your doctor a thing or two about infection control, blood-borne pathogens and cross-contamination.

Book Review: The Piercing Bible | Tribalectic

Book Review: The Piercing Bible | Tribalectic. by John Lopez I've been most nervous about the reviews of The Piercing Bible that are done by piercers. We tend to be opinionated individuals, and we don't always see eye to eye. So when I saw that piercer John Lopez had reviewed my book, I was a little nervous to see what he had to say. Turns out that he has plenty of positive perspectives on The Piercing Bible!

Facebook | Message: Hi

I received a Facebook message from a piercer in Serbia. He has a copy of my book, all the way over there!
Thank you a lot that you accepted me for a friend. You made me very happy. It is my distinct honor to keep your new book The Piercing Bible in my hands of which I received today. I am the master pirser in Serbia, Novi Sad in the Studio of tattoo & Piercing colled Be Beauty. Can not wait to read your book and learn so much from it, because you were the person for which I started, and dealing with the piercing. I will send you a friend request of my studio profile BeBeauty TattooPiercing , and I would be very grateful if you would view my work related to piercing and told me honestly what you think. Thank you in advanced! Best regards, Nikola Puvaca

Question From A Piercer

I just received this email from a piercer:
I am a regular reader of your advice in Pain Magazine and I am a huge fan of your recent book.  You have made me a better piercer...
I'm one of the only piercers in my area not looking for a quick buck.  My question to you is, how do I stop all this negativity in the profession in my area?  I believe that what really matters in this is our clients. I want to see them get the safest best piercing the first time around. I am often fixing many of these piercings these guys are doing and coming to find out that I'm being bad talked about, but in the end, I'm the one who is fixing their work.  I appericiate your time and again your book was an amazing source of information that all piercees should read prior to getting pierced. Thanks again,   Jeff
This is my reply: Hi Jeff, Thanks for the positive feedback--I appreciate it, and I'm glad to know that my work has been helpful to you. Unfortunately, the problem you describe is very common. I actually had a nearby piercer telling people that my studio reused needles and didn't sterilize anything, and that we were filthy and didn't know what we were doing! He told people that if they'd been pierced in my studio, they probably had AIDS and Hepatitis from it! My "bad neighbor" piercer had actually maligned me so much that I had people who had been fed the slanderous statements sign affidavits about what he said, and contacted an attorney who issued him a "cease and desist" letter! When people came in--sometimes concerned about what they'd been told, I simply behaved my usual professional way and educated them about the hygiene and sterilization procedures that were used in the studio.

Question From A Piercer

Hi, my name is Jake. I pierce at a shop in North Everett, Washington. I must say, every time we get a Pain magazine the first thing i do is flip right to your article and get my learn on. Yesterday, I went to hang out with a good friend of mine, Troy Amundson, he said I should shoot you an email. Sorry, if I am bothering you or if there is a better way to get a hold of you, please let me know. I just had one small question. I pierce right handed, and as a piercer I have been growing a lot (especially with the help of Troy), I realize, its time for me to learn to pierce left handed, so I can approach some piercings in a better manner. Troy said that he had practiced on leather, I've done that, I was just wondering if maybe you had any other suggestions to help maybe even build hand control or strength. Thank you soo much for your time and really its an honor just emailing you. Again, thank you. Jake Hi Jake, It is no trouble at all to reply. Thanks very much for the positive feedback--I hope that you find my articles to be helpful. It is better to reach me on my email, which I check much more frequently: angel@piercingbible.com (but please respond to my spam filter from spamarrest, or your mail won't get to me). Anyway, as far as piercing goes, I'm a left handed piercer and do all of my piercings with the needle in my left hand. I do not believe that this has hampered my skills. Sometimes it takes a little adjustment of my position and/or the client's position, but it seems to work just fine. Some people are more ambidextrous than others, and if it seems like it wouldn't be hard to build your skill with your non-dominant hand, then it is simply a matter of practice. Working on leather or thick fabric can be helpful before you progress to the paying public.
Syndicate content