Piercing

Helping Today's Youth

I just got this message from a reader:

Hey,
I love your book! I got my nose pierced at 14...still love it, never a dull moment :) I'm getting my industrial in a few months for my 16th birthday, and your book helped me learn what to do to prepare for a more advanced piercing and gave me more info on the piercings I've already got. So just wanted to say thanks :)
Megan

I replied:

Hi Megan,
Wow! You've gotten an early start. Glad to hear that my book has proved helpful in preparing you for your next piercing. I'm delighted to help. Thanks for the positive feedback; I appreciate it.
Take care and be safe,
Elayne


Escape From New York

Well, that's a little harsh. But the winter weather there is also harsh, so I'm happy to be back in the Yucatan, where the weather is literally 50+ degrees warmer than it was on the East Coast. It was between the 20s and 40s there, and here it is a breezy, but toasty 97 degrees. Yum!

My husband and I had a fantastic trip, and we were truly honored to speak at Yale University. You can see some reviews of my class on erotic piercings here and here.

While in NY, I stopped into a cool clothing store (where I found a geat pair of black leather pants) and ran into a woman who I'd met previously in my own studio in New Orleans. She's a very interesting person named Joshua Suzanne, and she did a brief interview with me:

"What Parents Need to Know"

That's the title of an article I was interviewed for that provides important information for parents about piercings their teens might get or have. The Piercing Bible was quoted and credited.

It starts off:

When done properly, piercing is safe. Elayne Angel is the author of The Piercing Bible – The Definitive Guide to Safe Body Piercing and the Medical Liaison for the Association of Professional Piercers (APP) and recommends following standard safety precautions for a safe piercing experience:

• the piercing should be done in a hygienic facility by a trained, experienced worker
• sterile, disposable equipment should be used
• jewelry of the correct material, size, and style should be inserted
• proper aftercare instructions should be followed

Click here to read the rest of the article.

 

Elayne Angel Lectures at Yale!

This past week I had the honor of visiting Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut to provide a lecture on Erotic Piercings for their Sex Week event. I gave an hour and a half talk to an attentive audience that consisted primarily of students (and a few professors as well!). My lecture was supported by abundant visuals (150 slides) throughout a PowerPoint presentation created especially for this event.

The focus of the class was genital piercings for both men and women, though I also covered the erotic possibilities of oral and nipple piercings, and emphasized the importance of seeking a highly qualified piercer. Graphic images of botched piercings drove that point home. I received a lot of positive feedback from members of the audience, several of whom reported that they were now considering getting genital piercings for themselves!

You can see the article here.

Surface Anchor Trouble

I got this message from a Facebook friend:

Back in November I got a micro dermal in my middle finger. I know now that is was a horrible place to get one. I have knocked it on things numerous amounts of times and caught it on clothing also. It would swell up, but after a day it would go back down. Well now it has been having puss coming out of it and the skin where the longer part of the bar is, is red and raised, like a fresh scar, and when a little pressure is on it, it looks like you can slightly see the metal. It's rejecting isn't it? If so, do I just let it reject on it's own or get it cut out? It isn't causing any pain, and the puss doesn't have an odor. Thank you so much! Jennifer

Hi Jennifer, Body art on the hands is notoriously hard to deal with. Unfortunately, it does sound as though it is rejecting. It is best to return to your piercer for an in-person evaluation and probably some assistance in removing it. There should be no necessity to "cut it out" though. Please see your piercer. By the way, the preferred terminology for this type of piercing (from the Association of Professional Piercers) is a "surface anchor." We want to distinguish it from implants and other more serious forms of body modification, because we view them as simply another type of piercing. When we use the terms "microdermal," "dermal anchor," or "microdermal implant," that can cause legislators to think we're doing something more serious than we are. Good luck, Elayne

Best of the Guestbook

The design for my website www.piercingbible.com is just about to be updated, and that's surely for the best. But, one slightly sad (but unavoidable) thing that is that my old Guestbook will be no more, and the posts will be unavailable. Some related good news is that all of my previous blog posts will still be available in the archives on the updated site. So, I've decided to make a blog post "Best of the Guestbook" to preserve some of the entries. Here we go!

Another Botched Triangle

I received an email from a woman who received a triangle that was so painful I was certain it wasn't properly placed without seeing a photo. She wrote:

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