foot piercing

Foot or Heel Piercing?

I received a question about a very unusual piercing placement:

Can you get a piercing on the heel of your foot????????
S.

My reply:

Piercing behind Achilles tendon


S.
I wouldn't recommend it. And even if you managed to do it, it would be VERY unlikely to be successful. The tissue there is dense and tight with little or no pinchable flesh. Piercings in such areas is very seldom remain for long--the body simply ejects the jewelry.

Importantly, a piercing in such an area would also have a significantly higher risk of infection than traditionally placed body piercings because of its proximity to the floor where dirt and germs are more abundant

I have seen a very rare placement of a piercing actually behind the achilles tendon the ankle (see Photo, courtesy of Jim Ward and PFIQ Magazine.) Suffice it to say, such a piercing has grave risks including potential for loss of function of the limb.

If you want to get pierced, please select a safer area of your body.

Surface Anchor Question: Fancy Feet?

I received a question from someone seeking unusual ornamentation:

Are surface anchor piercings permanent, and can you get them on your feet (top)?

Thanx, Sara

My reply:

Hi Sara,

No, unfortunately, even when everything is done right, surface anchors simply appear to be less of a permanent body modification than traditional body piercings.

Further, they require ongoing care throughout their life span, including regular irrigation to make sure no matter builds up in the channel or under the ornament. And even with this care, sometimes they will tilt and/or surface and reject.

On the feet, they are especially unlikely to be successful, even for a short period of time. There is little padding on top of the bone, and the area is subject to excessive trauma. Also, in that region you are at greater risk for infection than other parts of the body because of the proximity of the feet to the dirty ground.

In the event that a surface anchor were to actually heal and stay for longer than I would expect, there's some chance that a small amount of tissue could grow through the holes that are present in the base of most anchors (for the very purpose of helping the anchor remain in place). If that were to happen, it could still be removed by a piercer using ordinary piercing instruments.

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