Surface Anchors (Microdermals)

Surface Anchors (Microdermals)

Microdermal Piercing (Surface Anchor) Rejecting

 

I received a message from a person whose surface anchor was beginning to reject:  

Hello,

I got a chest microdermal around 9 months ago and the heel/bottom of it is rejecting. I'm getting it removed today and wanted to know what would the proper placement of a chest dermal be? I think I got it to low and all the tissue that was pulling on it was making so that it could not fully sit correctly. I'm just asking about this to see if getting one higher would be better. I also wanted to know if there was another type of piercing I could get there that would achieve the same effect except with better results. I love my dermal so much I'm just sad to say goodbye to it.

Thank you for your time.

Surface anchor beginning to reject

Hello.

I can understand your concern.

Unfortunately, even when everything is done right, surface anchors (the preferred terminology of the Association of Professional Piercers) simply appear to be less of a permanent body modification than traditional body piercings.

They require ongoing care throughout their life span, including regular irrigation to make sure no matter builds up in the channel or under the ornament. And even with this care, sometimes they will tilt and/or surface and reject.

There is no guarantee that repiercing in the area would result in better results. In fact, I think you can expect the same thing to happen again, which would only result in more scar tissue.

Below are some brief excerpts from my book, The Piercing Bible--The Definitive Guide to Safe Body Piercing

Surface Piercing

Surface Anchor ("Microdermal") Fell Out

I received this message from a gal who was concerned about her surface anchor:

Hi! I had a microdermal piercing today above my cleavage and not 4 hours after having it pierced  it fell out into my lap!

Is this normal? i'm scared of it getting infected. Should I go back to the piercing shop tomorrow?

Be great if you could get back :(
M. x

My reply:

Hi M.,
They usually last longer than that, but the truth is they aren't a permanent adornment the way regular body piercings can be.

Also, I don't know that I'd trust the piercer who put it in. They didn't bandage it with a wound sealant clear dressing? That is quite common following the procedure.

The fact that your jewelry came out doesn't have anything to do with an increased risk of infection, unless you touched the wound with dirty fingers.

I think you should go back and get your money back, and learn more about them before deciding whether or not to have it replaced (probably with a different piercer).

Sincerely,
Elayne

Elayne Angel, Author
The Piercing Bible--The Definitive Guide to Safe Body Piercing
President, Association of Professional Piercers

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Surface Anchor Question: Fancy Feet?

I received a question from someone seeking unusual ornamentation:

Are surface anchor piercings permanent, and can you get them on your feet (top)?

Thanx, Sara

My reply:

Hi Sara,

No, unfortunately, even when everything is done right, surface anchors simply appear to be less of a permanent body modification than traditional body piercings.

Further, they require ongoing care throughout their life span, including regular irrigation to make sure no matter builds up in the channel or under the ornament. And even with this care, sometimes they will tilt and/or surface and reject.

On the feet, they are especially unlikely to be successful, even for a short period of time. There is little padding on top of the bone, and the area is subject to excessive trauma. Also, in that region you are at greater risk for infection than other parts of the body because of the proximity of the feet to the dirty ground.

In the event that a surface anchor were to actually heal and stay for longer than I would expect, there's some chance that a small amount of tissue could grow through the holes that are present in the base of most anchors (for the very purpose of helping the anchor remain in place). If that were to happen, it could still be removed by a piercer using ordinary piercing instruments.

Microdermal Anchor Question

I received this message from someone with surface anchrs who was concerned about them:

Hi Elayne, I have four microdermal anchors, two in my fingers, and two in my wrists. I have had them for a few months, when I first got them done they were fine, but recently they have had infections (due to my job and all my animals) and I have been taking antibiotics for them. I have just noticed that on my wrist dermals small mounds have been forming, is this a sign of rejection, or just scar tissue? Thanks alot, L.

My reply:

Hi L.,

Without seeing them, I can't necessarily offer an opinion on exactly what is wrong, but I can say that such adornments are bound to be temporary. Surface anchors seldom last for the long-term--especially in such high-trauma areas. Also, such locations are more prone to infection than other spots. I hope that your piercer counseled you about these important facts before agreeing to do the piercings on you.

Did you consult your piercer? Did you visit your doctor for the antibiotics? What did your doctor say? Are you doing saline soaks and making sure there is no build-up of matter under the threaded jewelry end? Here's the aftercare instructions I advocate:

http://www.safepiercing.org/piercing/body-aftercare/

Sincerely,
Elayne

Elayne Angel, Author
The Piercing Bible--The Definitive Guide to Safe Body Piercing
Medical Liaison, Association of Professional Piercers


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