Question From A Piercer

This is a question from a piercer who is concerned about doing the right thing:
I would like to ask some advice from you, as I've had a weird request from a client this afternoon.  She is going into surgery this next week, and her surgeon told her that he would do her nipple piercings for her while she is under anesthesia if she could bring in the jewelry.  Of course, I was leary of wanting to sell the jewelry and encourage a possibly botched piercing. She also told me that the doctor suggested that a licensed piercer come in and do her piercings while she was under anesthesia (I would be concerned about any legal & ethical questions/ramifications resulting from piercing one under anesthesia-even if agreed upon in paperwork).  I would be open to piercing in a hospital setting, but, not sure if this is a route I would want to take?   I hate being put in a position where I would really prefer her to come to my studio and get pierced, but am afraid that she'll get the piercing anyway by someone who hasn't been trained to pierce.  (Her reason for doing it while under anesthesia is that she's had 2 very bad experiences with past nipple piercings.)  I guess we can't "save" all of them, but, what would be your best advice for a situation like this? *N*
Hi N, Well, that's not necessarily an easy question to answer. I believe you will need to decide the best course of action for yourself under the specific circumstances. I'm willing to tell you what my response would be in this situation: I wouldn't do it. I think you're correct; we can't "save" all of them. We can do our very best to educate and inform potential clients. As someone put it, "You can lead a horse to water but you can't make it drink." I'm afraid piercees are the same way. You can provide them with sound facts and information, but they may not put it to good use.

Outer Labia Piercing Jewelry

I received a question about initial jewelry for outer labia piercings, and it led me to make a few comments about piercing aftercare, too.

"Will My Piercing Close"?

This answers the common questions: how quickly will a piercing  close, and will it close completely?

Greetings, and thanks for your time in advance. I have had a VCH for about 2 years now, and my current connection has asked me to remove my piercing.  I have had the original jewelry in all this time, never once removed.  How long will it take (generally) to close up completely?  Or does it only shrink?  What kind of time frame should I expect? Thanks!

Hi Joy, Thanks for your email. The following section from my forthcoming book addresses your question:

VCH Anatomy Question

Hello! I came across your website (very informative!) and had a question. I am interested in getting a vertical hood piercing, but I am not sure if I had sufficient tissue for the piercing. I tried the cotton swab thing and although it seems like enough, I was still unsure. I would just feel strange going to a piercer, dropping drawers and them saying "sorry, no can do.". Kind of awkward. Any other ways I could make sure? Casey
Hi Casey, You're welcome to send me a photo of you doing the q-tip test, and I'd be happy to do my best to tell you whether your anatomy appears pierceable. In a piercing studio it is a daily occurrence that individuals are not suited to a particular piercing placement they desire. There is nothing to feel awkward about at all! It isn't a personal matter: each human body is unique and must be evaluated on an individual basis for suitability. A consultation before piercing for this purpose is very common. A good piercer will make you feel comfortable. He or she can also let you know what other piercings may be suited to your build, if not the one you wanted. Where are you located? Perhaps I can suggest a skilled piercer in your area. Sincerely, Angel P.S. To see video of me performing a VCH and the way the anatomy looks go here. [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="311" caption="Watch genital piercing videos"]Watch genital piercing videos[/caption]

Botched Triangle Piercing?

I am sorry to bother you again, but I ended up getting the triangle piercing and now have a situation on my hand that I do not know how to deal with. I have a feeling that the piercer placed it a tad too low. It looks fine ( at least to my untrained eye ) but I suspect that it is slightly under the clitoris rather than directly behind it. It is probably right on the border of where the clitoris ends and though I am sure it reached some nerves I do not think it hits the holy grail. When I press on the clitoris I do not feel stimulation behind it like the way you are supposed to. I do not think it sits in the optimum place. Then again, it's only been a few days. Should I go to the piercer and ask her to redo it? Should I wait till it heals fully before going back? I am afraid she will forget me if I wait that long. Plus, I do not want to lose time since  I will have to get it repierced and wait yet again for it to heal. Will getting a larger ring help? Am I supposed to pay the salon again? Is there any way that one could tell for sure if it's in the right place just by looking or is it the sort of thing that only the wearer can feel? I would really appreciate any advice that you could give me on the matter because I am at a loss and getting this piercing meant the world to me. Thank you so much for your attention. T.
Hi T., If you can send me some clear, close-up photos of the piercing and I'll do what I can to see if it appears properly placed. If it is only marginally low, then a larger piece of jewelry may do more for you--it is hard to say for sure. If it is not positioned where it should be, then you should have the jewelry removed as soon as possible to close the hole. You can return to your piercer to take the jewelry out and discuss the possibilities about repiercing. If you have a visible vein where the piercing should go (for example) then moving it may not be safe.

Princess Albertina Piercing Question

I have a friend who is interested in a Princess Albertina but has a few questions that I am unable to answer - mainly, comfort factor with regards to sex and cycling. She is also concerned about the comfort factor with regards to her male partner. Also, the urethral sensitivity ... although she has expressed an interest in sounding. Would you advise experimenting with sounding before committing to this piercing?
I'll be honest--I don't do Princess Albertina piercings. As a woman with a history of bladder infections and a knowledge of the anatomy (and how short the female urethra is, so close to the bladder), they just never seemed like a good idea. (Male anatomy is considerably different and a PA piercing is not at all likely to cause a bladder infection due to the greater distance from the tip of the urethra to the bladder.) Due to the relatively internal placement of the Princess Albertina, I'd imagine that cycling would not be problematic once initial healing has taken place. My educated guess is that some women would find the piercing enjoyable, and others would not prefer that form of stimulation--just like any other genital piercing. I'm certain, however, that it would be reasonable to experiment with some urethral play with sounds prior to committing to this piercing. She should see if she really does enjoy stimulation to her urethra prior to getting pierced. I would refer you to Jim Weber of Infinite Body Piercing for more information, as I know he has performed them. president at safepiercing dot org Sorry I can't be of more help with this one! Elayne

Question From A Piercer

Hi, my name is Jake. I pierce at a shop in North Everett, Washington. I must say, every time we get a Pain magazine the first thing i do is flip right to your article and get my learn on. Yesterday, I went to hang out with a good friend of mine, Troy Amundson, he said I should shoot you an email. Sorry, if I am bothering you or if there is a better way to get a hold of you, please let me know. I just had one small question. I pierce right handed, and as a piercer I have been growing a lot (especially with the help of Troy), I realize, its time for me to learn to pierce left handed, so I can approach some piercings in a better manner. Troy said that he had practiced on leather, I've done that, I was just wondering if maybe you had any other suggestions to help maybe even build hand control or strength. Thank you soo much for your time and really its an honor just emailing you. Again, thank you. Jake Hi Jake, It is no trouble at all to reply. Thanks very much for the positive feedback--I hope that you find my articles to be helpful. It is better to reach me on my email, which I check much more frequently: angel@piercingbible.com (but please respond to my spam filter from spamarrest, or your mail won't get to me). Anyway, as far as piercing goes, I'm a left handed piercer and do all of my piercings with the needle in my left hand. I do not believe that this has hampered my skills. Sometimes it takes a little adjustment of my position and/or the client's position, but it seems to work just fine. Some people are more ambidextrous than others, and if it seems like it wouldn't be hard to build your skill with your non-dominant hand, then it is simply a matter of practice. Working on leather or thick fabric can be helpful before you progress to the paying public.

Book Illustrations

Well, the illustrations for the book are done, and it was quite a journey. My illustrator/artiste extraordinaire is Jennifer Klapecki, and we had the good fortune to be introduced by a mutual friend. She did a sample illustration and the publishers and I were duly impressed and she got the job. There were 23 illustrations and we had just a few short weeks to get them all done. I really have to commend Jennifer on her dedication, because this job totally ate her life during the time we were working together. I'd send her photographs of piercings with written instructions about the angle for the image, jewelry styles and sizes, and other details. Sometimes I sent passages from the book that describe the piercing placements, too. She'd draw up a draft, scan it, and email it to me. I'd sometimes print it and use white out and pencils to show her the necessary edits, and then I'd scan and email the draft back to her. Sometimes I would write out instructions and other times I'd call her on the phone (from Mexico to the US via Skype--thank goodness for Skype!). Some of the illustrations went back and forth literally dozens of times! It was a very intense job for both of us, because the deadline was so tight. Jennifer was amazingly patient with me and so willing to do whatever it took to make the illustrations perfect. I think we made a great team and I'm thrilled with how they turned out.
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